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Carl "Rocky" Wargo reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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These guys are great. They offer great instruction from beginner to advanced. The atmosphere is extremely welcoming. No EGO. They do great classes for adults. I've showed up early and their classes for kids are so well run. The kids are engaged and having a blast. Highly recommend these guys. If you want to get in shape, defend yourself, or are just interested in learning more stop on by.

Robert Gorham reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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I spent 6 years in the military and have been training martial arts for over 10 years. A little over a year ago I got out of the Army and my buddy recommended this place for me. I tried it out day 1 and instantly signed up for a year. This last year and half has been some of the best time of my life. I have trained at many different gyms across the world and I feel I'll never goto another one. From day 1 you are considered family. I love this place and will always recommend this place. Love you Top Level!!!

Virginia Kirven reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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Top Level Martial Arts has very friendly instructors and teaches your children discipline and respect. My son has been going there for over a year and it's worth every cent! Would never think of taking him somewhere else. You become a family there!

Treavis Brownfoot reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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I happened to be in town this past week and needed a place to train. The kind folks at Top Level were most welcoming. I appreciate their kindness and open willingness to let me drop in and train with them. Everyone was real cool there and I really enjoyed myself while learning a few new tricks and got to roll around with folks who had their own preferences in style that I haven't felt yet. Everyone has their own specialties. All in all it was a great experience and maybe someday I'll find myself back out that way and we'll get to roll again and feel out our progress in this art we all love. Bless.

Julie Gallagher Root reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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I am so grateful a friend shared their experience with us about Top Level. I wasn't sure what Ju Jitsu was. My 5 year old has learned exactly what respect, discipline, integrity, courage, and focus are. We are so grateful because the skills he learns in his Ju Jitsu classes carry over into his home and school life. They even teach and role play about how to deal with a bully. The teachers are wonderful with the kids. You can tell the effectiveness of Mr. Jones and his staff just by observing how his students carry themselves. I highly recommend this school for any child.

Jim Stewart reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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I joined because my son wanted me to work out with him. I was skeptical because of my age and being out of shape. The instructors and fellow students made us feel welcome and encouraged us both. I have found that I enjoy it so much I go when my son is in school and then again with my him after school. Great experience, and would recommend it, not only for your kids, but for yourself as well!

Robert Hayes reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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It's a great experience for anyone of all ages especially kids.
I've seen such a great improvement in Landon K. since he's started, he has come a long ways since day 1 and he's only getting better and better with every class.
Very proud of Landon and what he's accomplished.
Thank you all

Sarah McDonnell reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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The staff is skilled and great with kids. My nephew loves the training and guidance he has received at TLMA. The owner (Bill Jones) is constantly doing community outreach programs and donates his time and resources to serve the city of Cuyahoga Falls.

Jessica Harrah reviewed Top Level Martial Arts
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Bill Jones runs this place so well. He is very invested in his business and it shows.The instructors are all awesome and GREAT with the kids! - They feel like family. I am so impressed!!

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Amazing Self Defense Interview!

Every once in a while, we come across a great article online and just have to share it. This article comes from the BJJ Easter Europe website, bjjee.com

It’s an interview between Mike Mella and a fellow BJJ Black Belt and Self Defense Expert named Eli Knight. We’ll link some of his youtube content below as well.

Here’s the article:

BJJ Black Belt Self Defense Instructor On Do’s & Don’ts in a Street Altercation

There are many videos on YouTube featuring BJJ practitioners in street altercations, and the majority of them seem to end in favor of BJJ. However, if you are inexperienced in the self defense aspect of BJJ, your chances of getting hurt dealing with an aggressively striking opponent might be higher than you expect. So what should you do if you are caught up in a situation where you are forced to take action and use the gentle art in a street fight? In an interview for BJJEE, acclaimed BJJ blackbelt and self defense instructor Eli Knight from Knight Jiu-Jitsu offers some insight on how to approach a street fight scenario.

  1. Avoid confrontation:Most street-fights are actually ego fights where you are not really protecting yourself or anyone else from imminent harm, and as such can be avoided. Your ego might take a beating by not engaging, but ask yourself: Is this fight really worth getting injured for or risking legal action?

 

  1. Situational Awareness:Simply, don’t go to stupid places with stupid people doing stupid things. This simple and rational suggestion will dramatically lower your chances of ending up in a street-fight. Take inventory of your surroundings, to include not only the atmosphere but also the people. Noticing environmental factors like the layout of the location, exits, bystanders, groups and individuals is crucial when/if you are forced into a physical confrontation.

 

  1. Verbal Jiu-Jitsu:Asking a question to cut them off verbally, or possibly use sentences like “I am sorry,” “I didn’t mean to offend you,” “my friend just died,” “I am on medication.” Verbal de-escalation along with other methods of avoidance are skills that require training, just as the physical aspect of fighting. So rather than spending 100% of your time simply repping techniques, some scenario-based training can greatly enhance your survivability.

 

  1. Don’t underestimate anyone:Always assume that the person you’re about to get into a fight with is stronger, bigger, more athletic than you are. BJJ (or any other martial art for that matter) is not exclusive to good guys making rational decisions. There’s no guarantee they’re untrained; they may be a former D1 wrestler or a former Pan-Am Champion.

 

  1. Recognize pre-fight cues and behavior:Is the person posturing in a way, blading his stance, shifting his weight, hiding his hands, shifting his glance or exhibiting other such behavior? These cues may indicate whether or not he will attack, as well as whether the attack is likely to be empty handed or with a weapon. This observational ability is essential in determining what counter measures you employ.

 

  1. Multiple threats:Along with situational awareness, it is crucial to recognize if others in the environment are there with the person accosting you. Tactically, you must consider the potential involvement of others in the conflict just as you would if they have a weapon, when deciding if and how you are going to engage. Many clinching and ground grappling positions leave you very exposed to outside interference, although they may be great control tactics for a guaranteed one-on-one fight.

 

  1. Don’t get into a slug fest!: According to research made by www.highpercentagemartialarts.com, an online resource, there is a 45% knockout rate occurring among fighters who remain on their feet compared to less than 2% getting knocked out while on the ground. And if you assume that the aggressor is at least as strong as you are, then the longer you stay in striking range, the higher the risk of you being knocked out. Staying too far from or too close to the opponent is safest when strikes are involved. And as mentioned before, controlling the person on the ground keeps you safer from high-velocity strikes than standing.

 

  1. Engaging the enemy:Sometimes a good offense is your best defense. If all other options are off the table and you have decided you must take action, then preemption in the form of a strike, push or arm drag may be enough to create an escape opportunity if one safely exists. It may not be necessary to stay in the fight until someone is incapacitated, but rather just do enough to access an escape route. However, if you don’t feel this is a reasonable possibility because of what you have observed to this point, then closing the distance, establishing a strong clinch and looking to get the fight to your area of proficiency is key.

 

  1. Take the fight to the ground: While this is obviously predicated on the previous caveats of situational awareness, multiple attackers, weapons considerations, etc., the ground can be the ultimate equalizer when there is a physical disparity in a fight. From the clinch, knowing a couple of simple takedown options like trips and body-locks can get the fight into the ground grappling range that greatly benefits the person with knowledge of the positional hierarchy of BJJ. Establish the top dominant position, whether mount, side control or knee-on-belly. Top dominant positions give you ideal ability to strike, stay safer from strikes, monitor the limbs and core of the opponent and employ submissions if possible. Having trained, you should understand how to efficiently transition from position to position through sweeps, reversals, upgrades and escapes (should you find yourself in a bad position).

 

  1. Finishing the fight: “Finishing” means getting out of the fight safely as possible and causing the least amount of damage as necessary. Pummeling someone into unconsciousness may be warranted sometimes, but causing excessive damage is problematic for many reasons. Using submission tactics for control and possible negotiation is preferable most of the time. Employing strangulation techniques can potentially be the best option at one’s disposal with the appropriate understanding and level of training. “Blood chokes” are the safest way to render someone unconscious if the ability to do so arises. And with proper understanding of ground fighting, the situation will arise.

Jiu-Jitsu as a fighting art was born on the battlefield reality-based physical confrontation. While it has changed over time, evolved in many areas and devolved in others, the effectiveness and efficiency of it still lives on. This is demonstrable in the sport and in the self-defense environment. Understanding the different considerations in how to structure your training can make you safer in every way.

 

Here’s a direct link to the article’s original location: https://www.bjjee.com/articles/bjj-black-belt-self-defense-instructor-on-dos-donts-in-a-street-altercation/

Here’s some good content from Mike’s YouTube page as well. Give him a like and subscribe! https://youtu.be/iadMJS1xWKM